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Daniel writes that a “little horn” will speak great words against God, will wear out the saints of God, and think to change “times and laws”:

Daniel 7:25 King James Version (KJV)
25 And he shall speak great words against the most High, and shall wear out the saints of the most High, and think to change times and laws: and they shall be given into his hand until a time and times and the dividing of time.

This “little horn” uprooted three horns, and had eyes like the “eyes of a man” and a mouth speaking “great things”:

Daniel 7:8 King James Version (KJV)
8 I considered the horns, and, behold, there came up among them another little horn, before whom there were three of the first horns plucked up by the roots: and, behold, in this horn were eyes like the eyes of man, and a mouth speaking great things.

There are ten horns which represents “ten kings” that came out of the fourth beast, after which the eleventh “little horn” uprooted three horns or “three kings” or kingdoms:

Daniel 7:24 King James Version (KJV)
24 And the ten horns out of this kingdom are ten kings that shall arise: and another shall rise after them; and he shall be diverse from the first, and he shall subdue three kings.

There are four beasts which represent four kingdoms, and the fourth beast according to Bible Prophecy is the fourth kingdom in the book of Daniel:

Daniel 7:23 King James Version (KJV)
23 Thus he said, The fourth beast shall be the fourth kingdom upon earth, which shall be diverse from all kingdoms, and shall devour the whole earth, and shall tread it down, and break it in pieces.

These four kingdoms, who are described as four beasts, are also depicted as a statue, with a head of “fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass, his legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay”:

Daniel 2:32-33 King James Version (KJV)
32 This image’s head was of fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass,
33 His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay.

The first beast or kingdom was Babylon, since Daniel writes that “four great beasts” came up, with the first being “like a lion” and had “eagle’s wings”:

Daniel 7:3-4 King James Version (KJV)
3 And four great beasts came up from the sea, diverse one from another.
4 The first was like a lion, and had eagle’s wings: I beheld till the wings thereof were plucked, and it was lifted up from the earth, and made stand upon the feet as a man, and a man’s heart was given to it.

In ancient Archaeology, Babylon had engravings of Lions with Wings:

The Lion of Babylon from a portion of the Processional Way leading to the Ishtar GateThe Lion of Babylon from a portion of the Processional Way leading to the Ishtar Gate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_of_Babylon

Daniel actually tells Nebuchadnezzar the King of Babylon, that he was the head of gold, or the first kingdom, in the dream that Nebuchadnezzar had:

Daniel 2:38 King James Version (KJV)
38 And wheresoever the children of men dwell, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the heaven hath he given into thine hand, and hath made thee ruler over them all. Thou art this head of gold.

The second beast or kingdom is described as “like to a bear, and it raised up itself on one side, and it had three ribs in the mouth of it between the teeth of it”:

Daniel 7:5 King James Version (KJV)
5 And behold another beast, a second, like to a bear, and it raised up itself on one side, and it had three ribs in the mouth of it between the teeth of it: and they said thus unto it, Arise, devour much flesh.

In another vision, Daniel saw a “ram which had two horns: and the two horns were high; but one was higher than the other” which is another interpretation of the “bear” that “raised up itself on one side” referring to two minor kingdoms, with one kingdom being stronger than the other:

Daniel 8:3 King James Version (KJV)
3 Then I lifted up mine eyes, and saw, and, behold, there stood before the river a ram which had two horns: and the two horns were high; but one was higher than the other, and the higher came up last.

The Bible plainly identifies this second beast as “Media and Persia” which explains the “bear” that “raised up itself on one side” as well as the “ram which had two horns”, “but one was higher than the other”:

Daniel 8:20 King James Version (KJV)
20 The ram which thou sawest having two horns are the kings of Media and Persia.

Media and Persia is described as “another kingdom inferior to thee”, meaning inferior to Nebuchadnezzar’s kingdom:

Daniel 2:39 King James Version (KJV)
39 And after thee shall arise another kingdom inferior to thee, and another third kingdom of brass, which shall bear rule over all the earth.

This second kingdom, Media and Persia, is represented by the great image or statue with “his breast and his arms of silver”:

Daniel 2:32 King James Version (KJV)
32 This image’s head was of fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass,

The Bible mentions that the second kingdom of Media and Persia destroyed the first kingdom of Babylon:

Isaiah 13:17-19 King James Version (KJV)
17 Behold, I will stir up the Medes against them, which shall not regard silver; and as for gold, they shall not delight in it.
18 Their bows also shall dash the young men to pieces; and they shall have no pity on the fruit of the womb; their eyes shall not spare children.
19 And Babylon, the glory of kingdoms, the beauty of the Chaldees’ excellency, shall be as when God overthrew Sodom and Gomorrah.

Daniel 5:30-31 King James Version (KJV)
30 In that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain.
31 And Darius the Median took the kingdom, being about threescore and two years old.

The third kingdom is identified as “Grecia” or Greece in today’s translation:

Daniel 8:21-22 King James Version (KJV)
21 And the rough goat is the king of Grecia: and the great horn that is between his eyes is the first king.
22 Now that being broken, whereas four stood up for it, four kingdoms shall stand up out of the nation, but not in his power.

The statement in the previous verse “and the great horn that is between his eyes is the first king” represents Alexander the Great of Greece, and the other verses “four stood up for it, four kingdoms shall stand up out of the nation, but not in his power” represent the four Generals that replaced Alexander the Great, and they were “Cassander, Ptolemy, Antigonus, and Seleucus (known as the Diadochi or ‘successors’)”:

Plutarch says that, 14 days before his death, Alexander entertained his fleet admiral Nearcus and his friend Medius of Larissa with a long bout of drinking, after which he fell into a fever from which he never recovered. When he was asked who should succeed him, Alexander said, “the strongest”, which answer led to his empire being divided between four of his generals: Cassander, Ptolemy, Antigonus, and Seleucus (known as the Diadochi or ‘successors’).

https://www.ancient.eu/Alexander_the_Great/

This kingdom of Greece with Alexander the Great, and his four generals Cassander, Ptolemy, Antigonus, and Seleucus were also described in the vision given to Daniel as “four wings of a fowl; the beast had also four heads”:

Daniel 7:6 King James Version (KJV)
6 After this I beheld, and lo another, like a leopard, which had upon the back of it four wings of a fowl; the beast had also four heads; and dominion was given to it.

So there were ten kingdoms that came out of Rome when it was divided: